June 2009


Posted from Diigo. The rest of ML 123 group favorite links are here.

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Posted from Diigo. The rest of ML 123 group favorite links are here.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of ML 123 group favorite links are here.

I know that this blog is strictly speaking just for mathematical literacy, but as many teachers who teach ML also teach mathematics, I will do some cross-over postings.

There have been much debate about Paper 3 in mathematics. Paper 3 is an additional paper for grade 12 learners to write. It consists of geometry, probability and a few other topics. Teachers can choose if they teach it to their learners and it was due to become compulsory in 2011, but this implementation date has now been postponed. It also has to be taught out of  time-tabled time which has resulted in teachers not offering it to their learners as an optional choice.

Learners who did not do Paper 3 in matric seem to battle with first year university mathematics and the question is if it should not be compulsory for  those who will be doing University level mathematics.

To address these issues, there will be a panel discussion to be held at the Marang Centre in Johannesburg on the 24th  June, 3pm – 5pm. Tea will be served from 2:30pm

Here is the blurp:
When the new FET curriculum for Mathematics was implemented in 2006, certain sections were designated as optional and examined separately in the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations in 2008 as Mathematics Paper 3. The Department of Education announced this year that the optional status of Paper 3 is to remain. Concerns emerging from interim first year results in Mathematics and related courses in the Universities have sparked interest in Paper 3 for students entering mathematics-related degrees and diplomas. As with many issues around the new NSC Mathematics examinations, the Paper 3 issue provoked some heated discussions. We believe that more light (and less heat) can be generated through bringing together various interest groups so that we may understand ranging needs and challenges. We all need to be able to make informed choices, choices that are both mathematically and educationally sound. The questions for this panel are thus:

  • What is Mathematics Paper 3 for?
  • Should all/some learners and schools be encouraged to offer Paper 3?
  • Should universities make Mathematics Paper 3 a requirement for entry to mathematics-related degrees?

The Mathematics for Teaching Thrust in the Marang Centre has organised a panel discussion to throw light on the issues around Paper 3, from various perspectives, particularly:

  • the National Department of Education
  • Practicing teachers
  • The university sector•

The four panellists will offer brief and informative presentations in the first hour. The second hour is for discussion with the intent of increasing our collective understanding of concerns and interests.
Please join us and add your perspective into the discussion
Panel chair: Professor Jill Adler, Chair of Mathematics Education, Wits University and Kings College London

Panellists:
Ms Penny Vinjevold, DDG: Further Education and Training in the National Department of Education.
Ms Lerato Mathenjwa, Mathematics teacher, S.G.Mafaesa Secondary School.
Dr Belinda Huntley, School of Mathematics, Wits University.
Mr Graeme Evans, Assessment Specialist with responsibility for Mathematics, IEB.

Panel Discussion 24th  June, 3pm – 5pm. Tea will be served from 2:30pm

When the new FET curriculum for Mathematics was implemented in 2006, certain sections were designated as optional and examined separately in the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations in 2008 as Mathematics Paper 3. The Department of Education announced this year that the optional status of Paper 3 is to remain. Concerns emerging from interim first year results in Mathematics and related courses in the Universities have sparked interest in Paper 3 for students entering mathematics-related degrees and diplomas. As with many issues around the new NSC Mathematics examinations, the Paper 3 issue provoked some heated discussions. We believe that more light (and less heat) can be generated through bringing together various interest groups so that we may understand ranging needs and challenges. We all need to be able to make informed choices, choices that are both mathematically and educationally sound. The questions for this panel are thus:

What is Mathematics Paper 3 for?

Should all/some learners and schools be encouraged to offer Paper 3?

Should universities make Mathematics Paper 3 a requirement for entry to mathematics-related degrees?

The Mathematics for Teaching Thrust in the Marang Centre has organised a panel discussion to throw light on the issues around Paper 3, from various perspectives, particularly:

  • the National Department of Education
  • Practicing teachers
  • The university sector

The four panellists will offer brief and informative presentations in the first hour. The second hour is for discussion with the intent of increasing our collective understanding of concerns and interests.

Please join us and add your perspective into the discussion

Panel chair: Professor Jill Adler, Chair of Mathematics Education, Wits University and Kings College London

Panellists:

Ms Penny Vinjevold, DDG: Further Education and Training in the National Department of Education.

Ms Lerato Mathenjwa, Mathematics teacher, S.G.Mafaesa Secondary School.

Dr Belinda Huntley, School of Mathematics, Wits University.

Mr Graeme Evans, Assessment Specialist with responsibility for Mathematics, IEB.