I am sure that you are all aware that we are due for curriculum revision which will be implemented in 2012. The revision document has been gazetted last Friday and can be downloaded from here:

At last Fridays Marang meeting, Mark North who was responsible for the revision of the Maths lit Curriculum, talked to us about how he went about compiling the new document which will basically replace all the other ML documents that we are currently working with. He was supported in this task by Arnout Brombacher as a critical reader. I am still waiting for Marc to send me his powerpoint, but in the mean time you can listen to his talk: (I will insert his PPT here when I get it).


Lynn Bowie then did a response to Marc’s presentation:

You can listen to her response here (click on it, minimise the player and the follow along with her presentation)

And there were of course lots of questions…..

I have tried my best to edit the worst  noise out, but in the interest of publishing it quickly, I apologise for bad sound quality here and there.

You can also go and leave comments on the LIVE document and see  others comments here:
The live docs are here:

A.notate.com is a great tool for quick colloboration. Just sign in with your e-mail address and highlight or drag a box anywhere on the document. It will open a box where you can insert a comment note. You can even comment on other’s notes. If you need any technical assistance please let me know and I will help you.

Advertisements

I attended the Marang symposium at Wits last Friday which considered ways in which we can judge last years examinations by taking a closer look at the papers and assessment structure. The talks centred around the questions:

  • What do different ways of classifying questions reveal about the relationship between the intended and examined curriculum?
  • What does this reveal about the relationship between the policy documents and practice?
  • What role can taxonomies play in analyzing the standard of the examinations, the spread of mathematical and science activities and what do they reveal about nature of the examinations and the conceptualization of the subjects?

Within our maths literacy community , one of the most often expressed concerns is about thinking levels (cognitive levels of taxonomy). And as such this meeting and the speakers illuminated just how difficult and subjective it is to pin it down. There were a general call for more examples of the different level questions and more problem solving higher order questions instead of more difficult levels of caluclation questions.

Prof Hamsa Venkat kicked off by discussing a critique of  the Mathematical Literacy assessment taxonomy. Lynn Bowie looked at it from a mathematics point of view and also examined different taxonomies. Arnout (always entertaining) then did a summary and his take on the issues and perspectives by providing a critique, not only on the two papers, but also on assessment practices regarding maths and maths literacy in general. You can (must)  listen to the actual podcasts of the sessions, by clicking here

Hamsa’s presentation (View while listening to her podcast- sorry I ahve not had a chance or had the energy to link it):

Lynn’s presentation: (View while listening to her podcast):

Our photo album:
Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about "Marang symposium", posted with vodpod

You are cordially invited to join us to mark Marang’s fourth year of innovation and leadership in Mathematics and Science Education in South Africa.

Friday, 9th October 2009, 15:00 – 17:00, followed by drinks and refreshments

Venue: Staff Room, Wits Education Campus (formerly JCE)

RSVP: Samantha Govender
samantha.govender@wits.ac.za
(011) 717 3414

At the end of 2008 South African school leavers wrote the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations for the first time. These examinations are based on the new National Curriculum Statement (NCS) and are high stakes examinations as they are used to determine, amongst other things, entry into tertiary institutions. In all its statements, the new curriculum was visionary, aiming to fulfil the aims of the South African Constitution by establishing a democratic and just nation. The first cohort of learners completed this new curriculum in 2008 and so it is appropriate at this point in history to reflect on this curriculum and its assessment.

This Marang symposium will consider how we judge the examinations through a closer look at the examination papers and assessment structure. Marang members will lead discussions in separate mathematics and science sessions on these as they relate to mathematics, mathematics literacy, life sciences and physical sciences on the following questions. Two respondents, one for maths and one for science will then provide reflections in a plenary session.

The following questions will be addressed in the symposium:

1.What do different ways of classifying questions reveal about the relationship between the intended and examined curriculum?

2.What does this reveal about the relationship between the policy documents and practice?

3.What role can taxonomies play in analyzing the standard of the examinations, the spread of mathematical and science activities and what do they reveal about nature of the examinations and the conceptualization of the subjects?

Respondents:

Aarnout Brombacher (Brombacher & Associates)
Aarnout Brombacher is a leading mathematics education consultant who has been centrally involved in national developments in Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy. He is a prominent commentator on both maths and maths literacy issues and a frequent visitor to Marang.

I know that this blog is strictly speaking just for mathematical literacy, but as many teachers who teach ML also teach mathematics, I will do some cross-over postings.

There have been much debate about Paper 3 in mathematics. Paper 3 is an additional paper for grade 12 learners to write. It consists of geometry, probability and a few other topics. Teachers can choose if they teach it to their learners and it was due to become compulsory in 2011, but this implementation date has now been postponed. It also has to be taught out of  time-tabled time which has resulted in teachers not offering it to their learners as an optional choice.

Learners who did not do Paper 3 in matric seem to battle with first year university mathematics and the question is if it should not be compulsory for  those who will be doing University level mathematics.

To address these issues, there will be a panel discussion to be held at the Marang Centre in Johannesburg on the 24th  June, 3pm – 5pm. Tea will be served from 2:30pm

Here is the blurp:
When the new FET curriculum for Mathematics was implemented in 2006, certain sections were designated as optional and examined separately in the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations in 2008 as Mathematics Paper 3. The Department of Education announced this year that the optional status of Paper 3 is to remain. Concerns emerging from interim first year results in Mathematics and related courses in the Universities have sparked interest in Paper 3 for students entering mathematics-related degrees and diplomas. As with many issues around the new NSC Mathematics examinations, the Paper 3 issue provoked some heated discussions. We believe that more light (and less heat) can be generated through bringing together various interest groups so that we may understand ranging needs and challenges. We all need to be able to make informed choices, choices that are both mathematically and educationally sound. The questions for this panel are thus:

  • What is Mathematics Paper 3 for?
  • Should all/some learners and schools be encouraged to offer Paper 3?
  • Should universities make Mathematics Paper 3 a requirement for entry to mathematics-related degrees?

The Mathematics for Teaching Thrust in the Marang Centre has organised a panel discussion to throw light on the issues around Paper 3, from various perspectives, particularly:

  • the National Department of Education
  • Practicing teachers
  • The university sector•

The four panellists will offer brief and informative presentations in the first hour. The second hour is for discussion with the intent of increasing our collective understanding of concerns and interests.
Please join us and add your perspective into the discussion
Panel chair: Professor Jill Adler, Chair of Mathematics Education, Wits University and Kings College London

Panellists:
Ms Penny Vinjevold, DDG: Further Education and Training in the National Department of Education.
Ms Lerato Mathenjwa, Mathematics teacher, S.G.Mafaesa Secondary School.
Dr Belinda Huntley, School of Mathematics, Wits University.
Mr Graeme Evans, Assessment Specialist with responsibility for Mathematics, IEB.

Panel Discussion 24th  June, 3pm – 5pm. Tea will be served from 2:30pm

When the new FET curriculum for Mathematics was implemented in 2006, certain sections were designated as optional and examined separately in the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations in 2008 as Mathematics Paper 3. The Department of Education announced this year that the optional status of Paper 3 is to remain. Concerns emerging from interim first year results in Mathematics and related courses in the Universities have sparked interest in Paper 3 for students entering mathematics-related degrees and diplomas. As with many issues around the new NSC Mathematics examinations, the Paper 3 issue provoked some heated discussions. We believe that more light (and less heat) can be generated through bringing together various interest groups so that we may understand ranging needs and challenges. We all need to be able to make informed choices, choices that are both mathematically and educationally sound. The questions for this panel are thus:

What is Mathematics Paper 3 for?

Should all/some learners and schools be encouraged to offer Paper 3?

Should universities make Mathematics Paper 3 a requirement for entry to mathematics-related degrees?

The Mathematics for Teaching Thrust in the Marang Centre has organised a panel discussion to throw light on the issues around Paper 3, from various perspectives, particularly:

  • the National Department of Education
  • Practicing teachers
  • The university sector

The four panellists will offer brief and informative presentations in the first hour. The second hour is for discussion with the intent of increasing our collective understanding of concerns and interests.

Please join us and add your perspective into the discussion

Panel chair: Professor Jill Adler, Chair of Mathematics Education, Wits University and Kings College London

Panellists:

Ms Penny Vinjevold, DDG: Further Education and Training in the National Department of Education.

Ms Lerato Mathenjwa, Mathematics teacher, S.G.Mafaesa Secondary School.

Dr Belinda Huntley, School of Mathematics, Wits University.

Mr Graeme Evans, Assessment Specialist with responsibility for Mathematics, IEB.

The Mathematical Literacy research thrusmarangt of the MARANG Centre is pleased to invite you to their first research seminar for 2009 entitled:

Developing mathematical thinking by integrating it into all mathematical work
Presenter: Professor Anne Watson

Tuesday, 26 May 2009, 15.00 – 17.00
Venue: M76
RSVP: Samantha Govender
Samantha.govender@wits.ac.za
011 717 3414

During the seminar presentation on Tuesday 26th May Professor Anne Watson from Oxford University in the UK will share details of some of her experiences of working with low attainers in mathematics. Her focus in this work has been on ways of moving beyond the negativity, low self-confidence and historical poor performance of these learners, to finding means to support their mathematical re-engagement. Professor Watson’s seminar will focus on the following:

I assume that the ability to deal with quantity and shape in everyday life depends in part on replacing the confidence which is often lost by failure to learn school mathematics. In this session I will give examples of tasks in school mathematics which draw on, and enhance, students’ thinking. The approaches I shall present make it more likely that students will feel better about mathematics, and at the same time promote confidence in dealing with outside mathematical situations.

The seminar and workshop are aimed at both mathematics and mathematical literacy teachers who are interested in enhancing the work they do with lower attaining learners, and will also be relevant to teacher educators and mathematics education researchers interested in the directions being taken in schools with the implementation of the new FET programme in which all learners now have to take either Mathematics or Mathematical Literacy.